Plan a Tour to India During Winter

The diversified land of India offers a wide array of pleasing tourist destinations for all seasons and for tourists with varying tastes. Most of the places offer their best attractions in winter season. Therefore, if you are planning to visit India in winter, you can have ample choices. Be it your honeymoon or a family holiday or just a routine vacation with friends, India will surely leave you mesmerized. From all the history buffs to nature lovers, wildlife lovers, adventure enthusiasts, honeymoon couples and even the religious minded people, everyone can satisfy his/her desires. A snowy Christmas in India is as exciting as a Goa carnival, a camel safari in Rajasthan, any adventure sport in the Himalayan ranges or even a sunbath alongside the exotic Goan or Kerala beaches.A few popular winter destinations in India are:

Kashmir – the home of numerous hill stations (like Srinagar, Gulmarg, Sonamarg, Pahlgam etc.) with some of the most splendid lakes and snow clad peaks; perfect for sightseeing, adventure and relaxation.
Auli (9,500-10,500 ft above sea level in Uttarakhand) – pine scented mountain slopes; ideal for skiing and sightseeing trips.
Shimla (the queen of hills, in Himachal Pradesh) – perfect for adventurous and religious tours.
Mcleodganj (close to Dharamshala, in Himachal Pradesh) – the abode of His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama; popular for Buddhist meditation centres, health clubs and monasteries.
Halflong (Assam) – wonderful sightseeing place with orange orchards, pineapple gardens and the wildlife species, blue hills, green rivers and cascading waterfalls.
Mount Abu (the only hill station in Rajasthan) – offers various adventure sports and Dilwara Jain temples.
Lake Chilka (Odissa) – paradise for bird lovers.
Corbett National Park (Uttarakhand) – home to around 50 species of mammals, 580 species of birds and 25 species of reptiles.
Backwaters of Kerala – 900 km long intricate network of waterways with tropical climate; houseboats are a unique attraction.
Goa – the queen of beaches; popular for carnival, trance parties, and countless festivities.
The northern belt of India, comprising of states like Jammu & Kashmir, Himachal Pradesh, Uttaranchal etc., is the most frequented part in winters. The true beauty of this region is highlighted at its best in the months of October to March.

Shoe Repairs And Several Other Things When I Was 7

Shoe Repairs And Several Other Things When I Was 7
My Dad repaired most of our shoes believe it or not, I can hardly believe it myself now. With 7 pairs of shoes always needing repairs I think he was quite clever to learn how to “Keep us in shoe Leather” to coin a phrase!

He bought several different sizes of cast iron cobbler’s “lasts”. Last, the old English “Laest” meaning footprint. Lasts were holding devices shaped like a human foot. I have no idea where he would have bought the shoe leather. Only that it was a beautiful creamy, shiny colour and the smell was lovely.

But I do remember our shoes turned upside down on and fitted into these lasts, my Dad cutting the leather around the shape of the shoe, and then hammering nails, into the leather shape. Sometimes we’d feel one or 2 of those nails poking through the insides of our shoes, but our dad always fixed it.

Hiking and Swimming Galas
Dad was a very outdoorsy type, unlike my mother, who was probably too busy indoors. She also enjoyed the peace and quiet when he took us off for the day!

Anyway, he often took us hiking in the mountains where we’d have a picnic of sandwiches and flasks of tea. And more often than not we went by steam train.

We loved poking our heads out of the window until our eyes hurt like mad from a blast of soot blowing back from the engine. But sore, bloodshot eyes never dampened our enthusiasm.

Dad was an avid swimmer and water polo player, and he used to take us to swimming galas, as they were called back then. He often took part in these galas. And again we always travelled by steam train.

Rowing Over To Ireland’s Eye
That’s what we did back then, we had to go by rowboat, the only way to get to Ireland’s eye, which is 15 minutes from mainland Howth. From there we could see Malahide, Lambay Island and Howth Head of course. These days you can take a Round Trip Cruise on a small cruise ship!

But we thoroughly enjoyed rowing and once there we couldn’t wait to climb the rocks, and have a swim. We picnicked and watched the friendly seals doing their thing and showing off.

Not to mention all kinds of birdlife including the Puffin.The Martello Tower was also interesting but a bit dangerous to attempt entering. I’m getting lost in the past as I write, and have to drag myself back to the present.

Fun Outings with The camera Club
Dad was also a very keen amateur photographer, and was a member of a camera Club. There were many Sunday photography outings and along with us came other kids of the members of the club.

And we always had great fun while the adults busied themselves taking photos of everything and anything, it seemed to us. Dad was so serious about his photography that he set up a dark room where he developed and printed his photographs.

All black and white at the time. He and his camera club entered many of their favourites in exhibitions throughout Europe. I’m quite proud to say that many cups and medals were won by Dad. They have been shared amongst all his grandchildren which I find quite special.

He liked taking portraits of us kids too, mostly when we were in a state of untidiness, usually during play. Dad always preferred the natural look of messy hair and clothes in the photos of his children.

Commercial Finance Funding and Identifying Zombie Banks

In the world of business finance funding, the colorful terms “Zombie Banks” and “Dead Banks Walking” have been applied recently to a number of commercial lenders. Although these discussions have an element of humor and entertainment, there is a practical aspect to them as well. Ultimately it is not likely to be in the best interest of a business owner to have extensive involvement with any of the banks which these terms describe accurately. In any case it should be beneficial for commercial borrowers to understand what constitutes a zombie bank and what they should do if they are working with a dead bank walking.For any business owner currently needing a commercial loan or working capital financing, the concept of “Dead Banks Walking” is likely to be an essential part of their decision. This description has been used by several sources recently, all with a similar reference point of banks which have already gone broke. This critical but apparently accurate assessment is largely derived from a straightforward net worth approach. Such an analysis recognizes that many banks have substantial assets which are either worthless or at least worth well below the values reflected on their books, with the resulting real current value being less than the current debts of many banks.Based on the evaluation of many observers who have realistically reviewed current asset values, most of the largest banks in the United States been shown to be worth even less than Lehman Brothers (which is already in bankruptcy). Many banks have compounded their public relations nightmare by demonstrating very little common sense in how they make commercial loans and spend money. If a bank is already worthless, it certainly calls into question how businesses and commercial borrowers will benefit by the government throwing money at these “zombie banks” in the first place. This controversy has been fueled by the failure of most banks to increase their commercial lending to business owners after receiving government bailout funds. Banks who have received bailout funds appear to be determined to hoard the money in order to preserve their own solvency rather than providing commercial finance funding to commercial borrowers.This raises several questions. The emerging consensus is that giving otherwise bankrupt companies (the dead banks walking) more cash does little more than cover the internal operating expenses for the zombie banks.First, should we really believe that a bank should be “saved” simply because it is so large? There appears to be a growing majority of the public which would suggest that these banks have already lost too much good faith to ever recover in response to some arguments that the largest banks cannot be taken over even if they are already insolvent.Second, is there a better way to solve the problem than giving insolvent banks more money? George Soros and others have recently described in detail how other banking systems have successfully handled mortgage financing. Even though residential and commercial real estate loans are thought to be at the heart of the current crisis, there is no real effort underway to revise this approach.Third, can business owners really afford to wait for the government to solve this problem? Although waiting a few weeks or even several months might be viable for a practical solution which results in needed commercial loans, the current logjam impacting business finance funding shows little evidence of subsiding that quickly. Prudent commercial borrowers should seek alternative sources for essential working capital financing such as business cash advances. In case it is not obvious from the discussion above, dead banks walking and zombie banks can be avoided when seeking new commercial financing.